Blog posts, news and thought leadership - VILDNIS – Tagged "ethical supply chain"

Blog — ethical supply chain



People, Planet and Profit: how did we do in our first year?

VILDNIS reached a milestone in May – our first birthday – and with that, it was time to take stock of how we are doing in terms of living up to our promise of being an ethical and environmentally friendly brand.  And we have done pretty well, if we may say so ourselves! As opposed to a traditional business measuring its success on profit only, VILDNIS operates with a triple bottom line, meaning that we measure our success on three areas: people, planet and profit. Earlier this month, we published a report showing our progress on our long and short-term goals in all three areas. Follow this link to the full report. Below are some of the highlights: Social impact...

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Who made your clothes?

Today is the start of Fashion Revolution week in which brands are encouraged by the global Fashion Revolution movement to be transparent about their supply chain in order to drive change in the fashion industry. The movement was born in 2013, out of the devastating tragedy in Rana Plaza, Bangladesh, where 1138 garment factory workers lost their lives when the building collapsed. Up until then, images from garment factories were seldom seen in the press; and we consumers rarely considered the people who made our clothes, their working conditions and how much they were paid. Indeed, many people I have talked with think that their clothes are made entirely by machines. It may be the way things are going in the...

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Why is ethical fashion important?

Do you know who made your clothes? With the aim of improving the working conditions for fashion workers across the globe, the Fashion Revolution movement is urging consumers to ask their favourite brands “who made my clothes?”. The placards illustrate the need for transparency in the fashion industry to overcome poor working conditions and unethical practises throughout the supply chain.In response, fashion brands with an ethical stance post pictures of workers holding placards saying “I made your clothes”.The images are largely symbolic. Small brands producing garments in an artisan way may be able to post an image of the person who hand embroidered your dress. However, this one smiling face does not truly represent the reality in which there are...

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